Weight Loss Surgery Does Not Reduce Depression

Weight Loss Surgery Does Not Reduce Depression

The positive outcomes of Weight Loss Surgery have been commonly touted, however what information is available on the less successful aspects and outcomes of Surgery?

For some people Weight Loss Surgery (also known as Gastric or Bariatric Surgery) has been very successful however, for some, the journey has not been so wonderful and not very successful.

For those who have Depression prior to Surgery, Weight Loss Surgery does not reduce Depression, in the long-term.

Weight Loss Surgery Positives

Bariatric surgery, gastric sleeve surgery, weight loss surgery, lap band surgery, weight loss surgery success, weight loss surgery outcomes, weight loss surgery research, weight loss surgery and depression, bariatric surgery and depression, gastric sleeve and depression, weight loss surgery and body-image, bariatric surgery and body-image, gastric sleeve and body-image, weight loss after bariatric surgery, weight loss after gastric sleeve surgeryResearch on Weight Loss Surgery has shown to have significant benefits on health indicators including:

  • Reducing Type 2 Diabetes;
  • Reducing risk of hypertension and heart disease;
  • Reduced cholesterol;
  • Reduced pain and pressure on joints, and
  • Reduced intake and need of medications.

Weight Loss Surgery Negatives

Bariatric surgery, gastric sleeve surgery, weight loss surgery, lap band surgery, weight loss surgery success, weight loss surgery outcomes, weight loss surgery research, weight loss surgery and depression, bariatric surgery and depression, gastric sleeve and depression, weight loss surgery and body-image, bariatric surgery and body-image, gastric sleeve and body-image, weight loss after bariatric surgery, weight loss after gastric sleeve surgery

Unfortunately, some people have been led to believe that Weight Loss Surgery is a cure for their eating issues and Obesity, almost like it being a magic fix.

Nothing can be further from the truth!

Research is finally catching up and it is starting to show the ‘real’ face and outcomes of Weight Loss Surgery for some people.

Weight Loss Surgery and Depression

One study reviewed patients who underwent Weight Loss Surgery before, at 6 months and 12 months Post-Surgery, for Depression.

This study found that there is a sub-group of people who have significant increases in Depression, 12 months after Surgery.

This same group also had lower self-esteem, psychological and emotional well-being.

Interestingly, this same sub-group lost more weight than the sub-groups that either decreased in Depression or had no change.

This study noted that the critical period for intervention is between 6 and 12 months, Post-Surgery.

Another study assessed patients before Surgery and again at 6, 12 and 24 months Post-Surgery.

This study also found similar results, with Depression starting to increase at 6 months, Post-Surgery.

The study also found a significant increase in Depression, in those who reported Depression levels, between the 6 and 24 months.

It was found that Post-Surgery Depression symptoms were associated with poorer weight outcomes and psychosocial outcomes.

A study reviewed patients between three (3) and seven (7) years Post-Surgery to determine if Depression was reduced after Surgery.

The findings identified that Depression is common among those opting for Weight Loss Surgery.

Again, in the initial stage Post-Surgery, Depression can decrease however, over time, Depression increases.

Weight Loss Surgery, Depression and Body Image

A study investigated a patient’s Pre-Surgery internal weight bias (negative feelings people have about their own weight and ability to manage their weight) and how this affected their weight loss 12 months Post-Surgery.

The study found that those who had higher internal weight bias scores, Pre-Surgery, had lower rates of weight loss and higher levels of Depression, than did those with lower internal weight bias.

General research has found that people with internal weight bias tend to have:

  • Low self-esteem;
  • Body dissatisfaction;
  • Feelings of lack of control over health, eating and weight;
  • Self-hatred;
  • Anxiety;
  • Eating Disorders and/or Disordered Eating Behaviours e.g. Binge Eating, Night-time Eating, Food Addiction;
  • Depression;
  • Social and relationship issues, and
  • Lower quality of life.

Therefore, if you are looking at having Weight Loss Surgery, it is important to ensure that you understand what could sabotage you in the short-term and long-term.

Weight Loss Surgery is not a guarantee for weight loss and health, long-term.

Especially, Weight Loss Surgery does not reduce Depression and this will stop your lifelong success and health goals.

This is why having a Weight Loss Surgery Psychological Evaluation will help you understand more about yourself and your health.

Fit Minds & Minds Clinic offers a Silver or Gold Standard Psychological Evaluation for Pre- and Post-Surgery.

Pin It on Pinterest