Weight Loss Surgery Does Not Reduce Depression

Weight Loss Surgery Does Not Reduce Depression

The positive outcomes of Weight Loss Surgery have been commonly touted, however what information is available on the less successful aspects and outcomes of Surgery?

For some people Weight Loss Surgery (also known as Gastric or Bariatric Surgery) has been very successful however, for some, the journey has not been so wonderful and not very successful.

For those who have Depression prior to Surgery, Weight Loss Surgery does not reduce Depression, in the long-term.

Weight Loss Surgery Positives

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  • Reducing Type 2 Diabetes;
  • Reducing risk of hypertension and heart disease;
  • Reduced cholesterol;
  • Reduced pain and pressure on joints, and
  • Reduced intake and need of medications.

Weight Loss Surgery Negatives

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Unfortunately, some people have been led to believe that Weight Loss Surgery is a cure for their eating issues and Obesity, almost like it being a magic fix.

Nothing can be further from the truth!

Research is finally catching up and it is starting to show the ‘real’ face and outcomes of Weight Loss Surgery for some people.

Weight Loss Surgery and Depression

One study reviewed patients who underwent Weight Loss Surgery before, at 6 months and 12 months Post-Surgery, for Depression.

This study found that there is a sub-group of people who have significant increases in Depression, 12 months after Surgery.

This same group also had lower self-esteem, psychological and emotional well-being.

Interestingly, this same sub-group lost more weight than the sub-groups that either decreased in Depression or had no change.

This study noted that the critical period for intervention is between 6 and 12 months, Post-Surgery.

Another study assessed patients before Surgery and again at 6, 12 and 24 months Post-Surgery.

This study also found similar results, with Depression starting to increase at 6 months, Post-Surgery.

The study also found a significant increase in Depression, in those who reported Depression levels, between the 6 and 24 months.

It was found that Post-Surgery Depression symptoms were associated with poorer weight outcomes and psychosocial outcomes.

A study reviewed patients between three (3) and seven (7) years Post-Surgery to determine if Depression was reduced after Surgery.

The findings identified that Depression is common among those opting for Weight Loss Surgery.

Again, in the initial stage Post-Surgery, Depression can decrease however, over time, Depression increases.

Weight Loss Surgery, Depression and Body Image

A study investigated a patient’s Pre-Surgery internal weight bias (negative feelings people have about their own weight and ability to manage their weight) and how this affected their weight loss 12 months Post-Surgery.

The study found that those who had higher internal weight bias scores, Pre-Surgery, had lower rates of weight loss and higher levels of Depression, than did those with lower internal weight bias.

General research has found that people with internal weight bias tend to have:

  • Low self-esteem;
  • Body dissatisfaction;
  • Feelings of lack of control over health, eating and weight;
  • Self-hatred;
  • Anxiety;
  • Eating Disorders and/or Disordered Eating Behaviours e.g. Binge Eating, Night-time Eating, Food Addiction;
  • Depression;
  • Social and relationship issues, and
  • Lower quality of life.

Therefore, if you are looking at having Weight Loss Surgery, it is important to ensure that you understand what could sabotage you in the short-term and long-term.

Weight Loss Surgery is not a guarantee for weight loss and health, long-term.

Especially, Weight Loss Surgery does not reduce Depression and this will stop your lifelong success and health goals.

This is why having a Weight Loss Surgery Psychological Evaluation will help you understand more about yourself and your health.

Fit Minds & Minds Clinic offers a Silver or Gold Standard Psychological Evaluation for Pre- and Post-Surgery.

Major Nutritional Risks on Weight Loss Surgery

Major Nutritional Risks on Weight Loss Surgery

Gastric bypass surgery is commonly reputed as an effective method to treat obesity.

However, it have far reaching consequences long after the patient has been under the knife.

Obesity is getting increasingly common in the recent years.

It is evident across many countries in people from all walks of life.

With its rise also comes a long string of methods and procedures that promises to solve the problem – everything from supplements and diets to exercise and workout regimens.

Among these, bariatric surgery – more commonly referred to as gastric bypass surgery – is usually noted as the most effective means.

In fact, it doesn’t just reduce body weight; it also helps reduce Comorbidities such as Diabetes and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

However, gastric bypass surgery has nutritional consequences – side effects that a patient can suffer long after the procedure.

Bert Seelman explains that in surgical weight loss, you alter your body when doctors reconnect your intestine to a different part of your digestive tract.

The change in the order of your body’s system brings health problems as the re-ordering bypasses critical nutrients that according to research commonly occur.

Nutritional Consequences of Weight Loss Surgery 

Nutritional Consequences of Weight Loss Surgery

Registered Pharmacist Suzy Cohen explains the nutritional consequences of gastric bypass in that, major deficiency in macro and micro-nutrients can potentially lead to the following symptoms: 

  • Fatigue;
  • Anaemia;
  • Memory loss;
  • Cognitive changes, and
  • Loss of vitality.

These symptoms can lead to severe conditions such as:

  • Trouble walking;
  • Alzheimer, and
  • General loss of health & functioning.

Prescription medications according to Cohen, adds another layer of nutritional complexity and some of these issues are:

  • B12 and CoQ10 can be drained when you take metformin for your blood sugar;
  • If you are prescribed antidepressants, then antimicrobials can further impair your probiotic stores as iodine level decreases, and
  • For women who will later become pregnant can have foetal complications if they don’t receive adequate nutrients such as iron, B12, vitamin A, vitamin K and natural methyl folate.

Considering Weight Loss Surgery?

Considering Weight Loss Surgery?

If you are thinking that gastric bypass surgery is the ultimate key to your weight loss, think again.

Many consequences are irreversible.

The fact remains that you can possibly regain your weight even after the surgery and in the worst case, it can be fatal.

It is important that you understand the risks and how you should prepare and manage the consequences in the event that it is necessary for you to undergo the procedure.

Nutritional care is crucial to gastric bypass surgery according to The Australian Family Physician (AFP).

A nutritionist plays an important role to help you ensure adequate nutrition that your body needs after the surgery. 

However, your cognitive preparation for weight loss surgery to ensure optimum health is a vital key to the success and/or failure of the process.

Although Weight Loss Surgery is an effective treatment for overweight and obesity by limiting the amount of food intake, Weight Loss Surgery does not:

  • Control the quality of food consumed;
  • Fix your relationship with food and eating;
  • Heal Disordered Eating such as Binge Eating and Emotional Eating, or
  • Make you love yourself and your body. 

If you are considering your Weight Loss Surgery options, you may consider having a Weight Loss Surgery Evaluation.

An Evaluation will assess your entire life and who you are, including all of your past and presenting issues and patterns that have caused any negative cycles. 

We will help you identify the underlying issues maintaining your unhealthy relationship with food and eating and provide practical strategies for you to build a life filled with purpose, fulfilled, happiness and health.